Summary

'''Claudio Giovanni Antonio Monteverdi''' (; 15 May 1567 (baptized) - 29 November 1643) was an Italian composer, gambist, singer and Roman Catholic priest.

Monteverdi's work, often regarded as revolutionary, marked the change from the Renaissance style of music to that of the Baroque period.Halsey, William D., ed. ''Collier's Encyclopedia''. Vol. 16. New York: MacMillan Educational Company, 1991. He developed two styles of composition - the heritage of Renaissance polyphony and the new basso continuo technique of the Baroque.Ringer, Mark. ''Opera's First Master: The Musical Dramas of Claudio Monteverdi''. Canada: Amadeus Press, 2006. Monteverdi wrote one of the earliest operas, ''L'Orfeo'', a novel work that is the earliest surviving opera still regularly performed. He is widely recognized as an inventive composer who enjoyed considerable fame in his lifetime.